Welcome to Seasons Readings: The Adult Winter Book Club!

This program will run December 27th – March 21st.

We have set up this website so you can submit your reviews without leaving your home. Additionally, you can browse through reviews other people have written if you are looking for book suggestions. Your reviews will be posted periodically, so make sure to stop by this website on a regular basis. Feel free to email any questions or comments to brian.bonelli@commackpubliclibrary.org

Join us on March 21st for our gathering to eat, drink and discuss all our favorites. Come in and pick up your packet anytime on or after December 27th.

Below you will find reviews that have been submitted by those that have already joined the club!

If you would like to add a review, please click on "Add a Review", which is located on the menu bar at the top of this page.

The novel details the story of an American ballerina who helps a male Russian dancer defect to the West. It explores how their lives intersect, as well as giving the reader a glimpse in to the behind the scene world of ballet. It’s always disappointing to me when I can guess the “surprise” ending just a quarter of the way through the book, which was the case with this story.

Evaluation: 3 out of 5

This novel is a bit unique as it is written from the perspective of an older Lebanese woman. She recounts stories from her life growing up during the Lebanese civil war. She touches on subjects such as the role of women in Arab culture, the impact of war on a society, and how a woman’s relationship with her friends can impact her life. It is a story of love, loss, regret and hope. I did find it difficult at times to keep track of everything as the stories were often not in chronological order.

Evaluation: 4 out of 5

This is the latest novel involving the criminal investigation team of Dr.Kay Scarpetta, medical examiner in Boston, and her FBI profiler husband Benton, tech genius niece Lucy and police detective Marino. They band together to solve several murders linked by copper bullets. I found this latest effort rather formulaic, and not too exciting. I thought the author’s attempt to surprise the reader in the end when the culprit is revealed, was actually a letdown.

Evaluation: 3 out of 5

The book reads like a desperate cash grab by the late Andy Kaufman’s collaborator/writer Bob Zmuda. Zmuda comes across here as a vile narcissist; he spends the bulk of this book writing about himself and bringing up petty issues that he has with Kaufman’s family and everyone involved with the making of the Kaufman biopic “Man on the Moon.” Every now-and-then he throws in ridiculous claims about Kaufman that transparently are only there to generate controversy and help book sales. I hated this, but I must confess, this is probably the type of biography Kaufman would have wanted.

Evaluation: 1 out of 5

If you’ve watched any sitcoms over the past twenty or so years, you’ve probably seen Fred Stoller at one point. This book chronicles his life in show business as a character actor that has often be hired to do guest spots on TV shows that require an annoying and neurotic tall guy. Some of his stories are funny, some are kinda sad, and a few are just plain pointless, but overall this was a fairly interesting look at the TV industry from an actor’s perspective. If anything, this is worth reading just for the chapter about his year as a writer for Seinfeld.

Evaluation: 3 out of 5

This is a collection of humorous writings by veteran comedy writer/performer Bob Odenkirk. I’ve been a fan of Odenkirk since 1996 (after accidentally discovering “Mr. Show” on HBO), and I personally found this book to be hit-or-miss, but laughed out loud enough times to say that I enjoyed it.   Recommended for fans of the absurd.

Evaluation: 3 out of 5

This book is a memoir detailing an incredible journey taken by the author during the summer of 1995 when she was twenty-six years old. She hiked over 1,100 miles on the Pacific Crest Trail (the PCT), starting in Mojave, California, and ending her trek three months later at the Oregon/Washington border. Along the way she met many interesting people, some of whom hiked with her for portions of the journey. She experienced extremes in temperatures, ranging from 100-plus degrees in the desert to below freezing in snow-covered mountains. I am greatly impressed by anyone who has the endurance to accomplish such a feat, but I felt especially awed by Cheryl Strayed, as it is a very rare undertaking for a solo female hiker.

Evaluation: 5 out of 5

This is an enchanting story of a family whose members must confront secrets from their past in order to move forward in their lives. It’s beautifully written and emotionally compelling. I highly recommend it.

Evaluation: 5 out of 5

This book is historical fiction based on the story of the sinking of the Titanic, and the congressional hearings that endeavored to determine the cause of the tragedy. Characters in this book include both fictional and real people who sailed on the ill-fated ship. The title refers to a young woman (fictional)) who gets a job as a maid to a well-known dress designer (real) just as the ship is about to sail, and who aspires to become a couturiere in her own right. The book details stories of bravery and heroism, but also of cowardice and selfishness, among the passengers, and recounts actual testimony from many of the survivors.

Evaluation: 5 out of 5

This is Alexander McCall Smith’s latest addition to his “#1 Ladies’ Detective Agency” series. The title refers to a new cafe being opened by one of the detectives. But the book also focuses on the self-styled detectives trying to identify a woman who claims to have amnesia. I have read many of McCall Smith’s books (he writes several different series), and I have found all of them to be fun and easy reading, but I think they are better suited to young teen-age readers. I read them occasionally as a pleasant respite between more serious and thought-provoking tomes.

Evaluation: 3 out of 5